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Journaling

Why journaling helps

The best way to create your future is by knowing your history. Your journal lays your thoughts and actions in front of you like a life map, giving you the opportunity to step back and see a blueprint of who you really are. This journal will be where you get to be you, outside of what is polite, appropriate, accepted and expected. The more real you are, the more you heal and grow.

When journaling helps

When looking for clarity - You don’t know where to focus, you just know that you’re not where you want to be. Journaling can give you a more clear vision of your life and issues to help you see what’s holding you back.

When you’re ready for success - Writing gives you a chance to plan how you’ll achieve success and see your progress. Even if you write about failing, you’ll still remind yourself of the ultimate goal, which keeps your eyes on the prize.

When you’re the enemy of yourself - You say things to yourself that you’d never say to someone you love. You sabotage rather than support yourself. Journaling can help you see the pain you cause yourself, so that you can change your self-talk to self-compassion.

When there’s deep pain - Trauma cuts deep into the soul, but we rarely know how to heal what we can’t see. Writing about those traumas can begin the healing, no matter how old the wound.

Who journaling helps

Overthinkers - Your mind races when you should be sleeping. You’re paralyzed by too many decisions. Get the thoughts out of your head and in front of you.

Busy People - You can’t start journaling because you don’t have the time, right? Make the time. Pausing to reflect is even more important for those that feel they don’t have time. This is for you. Always make time for you.

Everyone - Looking inside and learning who you are is literally the most important part of growth and change, so there isn’t anyone that journaling wouldn’t serve.

How to begin

1.Pick a medium
Choose something that you’d want to come back to. It doesn’t have to be pen and paper. Writing an email, making notes on your phone, or keeping docs on your computer is just as good as a notebook. If none of that sounds good, don’t write. Video or sound recording works too.

2.Make a time commitment
Promise that you’ll record your thoughts for at least five minutes, fifteen minutes, or whatever time you feel you can commit to. Don’t worry about “enough time”, just aim for daily consistency. It’s better to write a sentence than nothing at all.

3.Prompt Yourself
It’s hard to write when you don’t know where to begin. Make it easy – start with a question about what you want to focus on. It could be “What am I grateful for?” or “What am I scared of?” or “How do I define love?”.

4.Review and Reflect
Getting the thoughts out is only half the battle. You need to reflect on what you wrote. Pick a day of the week or month to go over what you recorded. You should look forward to this day because it’s going to give you something valuable – perspective. Read, watch, or listen with compassion. What has changed? What has stayed the same? Where do you want to be? How can you get yourself there?

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